Metro: Marijuana impairment rising among drivers

LAS VEGAS — Metro Police said they have a huge problem on their hands when it comes to people using marijuana and driving. During the last three years, Metro’s forensics lab screened 4,500 blood samples for marijuana with the bulk of those being impaired drivers. In Crystal Hill’s home, there are memories and pictures of her 18-year-old son Jesse. Jesse died January 1 while walking with his girlfriend. The two were near the family’s home when a car slammed into them. Court records show the driver, Christian Diaz, had seven times the legal amount of marijuana in his blood. “I had to file his first and last tax return yesterday. His brother doesn’t talk about him,” Crystal Hill said. “They’re twenty months apart in age. They were book ends. That was his hero.” Metro Police said marijuana impairment is a problem, and it’s getting worse. Metro said drug impairment, unlike alcohol impairment, isn’t easy to detect. Department statistics show if police tested each impaired driver involved in a fatal crash today, one in ten would likely test positive for marijuana. “If it continues on this path, in the next five or six years, we could see marijuana and other non-alcoholic drugs overtake our DUI problem with alcohol,” Sgt. Todd Raybuck of Metro’s Traffic Bureau said. “We have a short memory when it comes

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DUIs For Even a Trace of Weed Being Considered in California

click to enlarge                                               Timothy Norris for LA Weekly A proposal in the state legislature could mean DUIs for drivers who aren’t stoned but who toked a few days ago. It would also target motorists who have even a trace of such prescription drugs as Ambien, Vicodin or even phentermine, a diet drug, in their systems when they’re stopped by cops who think they’re impaired. Medical marijuana supporters are aghast. And they might have good reason to be: Weed’s main ingredient, THC, can stay in your bloodstream for a few days, even if you’re long past being stoned. The cannabis community says laws like this (which was also proposed last year, unsuccessfully) will have the effect of persecuting regular medicinal users. The bill, AB 2500, was recently introduced by Assemblyman Jim Frazier. It would mean that any detected amount of any controlled substance, including some prescription medicines, would be cause for a drunk-driving conviction. We reached out to Frazier’s people for his take on this, but we had yet to hear back. According to the language of the legislation:   This bill would make it unlawful for a person to drive a motor vehicle if his or her blood contains any detectable amount of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol of marijuana or any other drug classified in Schedules I, II, III, or IV of the California

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CDOT Launches New Campaign to Target Marijuana Impaired Driving

CDOT Launches New Campaign to Target Marijuana Impaired Driving Drive High, Get a DUI STATEWIDE—Colorado made history this year by becoming the first state to sell marijuana to anyone over the age of 21. At a press conference this afternoon, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) made history again by announcing the launch of an education campaign targeted at drivers about the dangers of driving under the influence of marijuana. In 2012, there were 630 drivers involved in 472 motor vehicle fatalities on Colorado roadways. Of the 630 drivers involved, 286 were tested for drugs. Nearly 27 percent of drivers tested had a positive drug test, with 12 percent testing positive for cannabis. The official kick-off of CDOT’s new Drive High, Get a DUI campaign includes a series of television commercials that will air during shows targeting males between the ages 21-34, who tend to have the highest number of DUIs. There will also be widespread outreach to rental car companies and dispensaries to inform tourists and marijuana users about marijuana driving laws in Colorado. “Before beginning the campaign, we did extensive research about medical and recreational marijuana users’ perceptions of marijuana’s effects on driving,” said Amy Ford, CDOT Communications Director. “We heard repeatedly that people thought marijuana didn’t impact their driving ability, and some believed it actually made them a better

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‘Drive High, Get a DUI’ campaign launches in Colorado to stop stoned driving

DENVER – Colorado is launching a new “Drive High, Get A DUI” campaign to remind drivers that newly legal weed should be treated like alcohol and not consumed before driving. The campaign includes radio and TV ads and new posters to be displayed in dispensaries. The other part of the effort is enforcement. Right now, 200 officers of various agencies are trained recognition experts. Another 20 graduated with that certification Thursday. Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper calls this a top priority, and wants at least 300 officers to be trained with this certification by next year. During 56 hours of training, officers are taught a 12-step process for recognizing the symptoms of drivers who may be impaired by a variety of drugs or alcohol. With marijuana, the officers are taught to look for enlarged pupils, sniff for the drug’s odor and look for small tremors in the driver’s body. “We teach them to look at certain things, and it is kind of an elimination process,” said Sgt. Rodney Noga from the Colorado State Patrol. Officers also check blood pressure, muscle softness and look for injection sites for other kinds of drug use. If drivers fail the observation test, a blood test is the next option to confirm or deny the presence of drug or alcohol impairment. The effort from the Colorado

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Officers will ‘aggressively’ seek drunken drivers Friday.

Classified Marketplace Buy a classified Features Special Sections Anniversaries Engagements Weddings Births Announcement forms Entertainment Police Reports Area Briefs Photos Submit Photos Submit letter to editor Opinion Obituaries MC Weekly Heartland Magazine Parade of Homes TV Weekly 2014 Bridal Planner Special Sections [friday] Contact Us Coupons Kokomo Apartment Guide ktoffers.com ktbizlinc.com Advertiser Index Site Map Digital Archives Area Briefs Search                       Search Results ClosePrevious          Now showing:                      of                      Next PreviousNextClose Discussion March 11, 2014 Police to set up DUI checkpoints Officers will ‘aggressively’ seek drunken drivers Friday. From Staff Reports Kokomo Tribune   The Kokomo Tribune       Tue Mar 11, 2014, 02:50 AM EDT Law enforcement officers Friday will set up DUI checkpoints targeting impaired drivers in Howard County. Indiana State Police, the Kokomo Police Department and the Howard County Sheriff’s Department all will participate in the checkpoints. After the checkpoints, troopers will conduct roving saturation patrols aggressively seeking impaired drivers throughout the Indiana State Police Peru District, which covers Cass, Fulton, Grant, Miami, Howard, Tipton and Wabash counties. The purpose of enforcement checkpoints is to remove impaired drivers from Indiana roadways before they cause needless pain, suffering or death to innocent victims, police said. Police issued these reminders so motorists do not find themselves over the limit and under arrest: • Plan ahead and always designate a sober driver

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