Women More Likely in Accidents than Men

Women More Likely in Accidents than Men

A recent study released by Taiwan’s Ministry of Transportation and Communications suggests women more likely in accidents than men, by 3.1%. The study was actually published a couple of weeks ago, and for the first time, cited numbers provided by the Taiwanese National Police Agency. Of the nation’s 7.23 million males with driver’s licenses, 10.2 percent had gotten into accidents. Of the 5.3 million licensed women, 13.3 percent had been involved in accidents. Women were also more likely in accidents involving scooters and motorcycles than males, but this difference was only 0.6 percent higher. Wang Jing-yuan, associate professor at National Chiao Tung University and a long-time analyst, who is involved in judging traffic cases, said that though women are in accidents a greater degree, male drivers are involved in more severe traffic collisions and deaths, as they are more likely to engage in speeding than females. Women, on the other hand, were more likely in accidents due to failing to notice other vehicles coming their way, failing to maintain safe driving distances with other vehicles, neglecting to yielding the right of way, not abiding by traffic signs and speeding.

Self-driving Cars Set to Lower Insurance Rates

Self-driving Cars Set to Lower Insurance Rates

Self-driving cars are becoming more acceptable to American motorists, according to a survey last October of 1,500 U.S. drivers. Fifty-five percent of those surveyed said it was “likely” or “very likely” they would buy a semi-autonomous vehicle for some of their driving. It has already been documented that self-driving cars will lower insurance rates, in much the way as having anti-lock brakes or being an accident-free driver. What was surprising in this survey was that the expectation of lower insurance premiums was the principal reason the drivers gave for purchasing a self-driving car.

Undocumented Drivers Face 6 Months’ Wait

Undocumented Drivers Face 6 Months’ Wait

Undocumented drivers in Illinois are facing wait times of up to six months–just to get an appointment. Others are driving hours to find an office that can help them more quickly. The Illinois General Assembly passed the undocumented drivers law back in 2012, hoping to license some of the quarter million undocumented residents estimated to live in the Prairie State. Secretary of State Jesse White (whose office administers driver’s licenses in Illinois) said the pace was on the “right track,” noting that his office was given only eight months to prepare for the new program. Illinois is one of 11 states nationwide that issues driver’s licenses to undocumented drivers.

Teen Driver Program Cuts Fatality Rate in Half

Teen Driver Program Cuts Fatality Rate in Half

A teen driver program that gradually gives teens full driving privileges is credited with reducing teen driver fatalities by 54.2% in Illinois. According to the Illinois Department of Transportation, 15 year olds must log 50 driving hours and nine months with a permit before taking the test for their license. After that, they are subject to further time-of-day and passenger restrictions. The National Safety Council recommends a graduated driving program for all teen drivers.

Milpitas police to target impaired drivers with DUI checkpoint

Milpitas Police Department’s traffic unit will conduct a driving under the influence/driver’s license checkpoint from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. Saturday, May 24 on Great Mall Parkway. The deterrent effect of DUI checkpoints is a proven resource in reducing the number of persons killed and injured in alcohol or drug involved crashes, according to police. Research shows that crashes involving an impaired driver can be reduced by up to 20 percent when well-publicized DUI checkpoints and proactive patrols are conducted routinely, according to law enforcement. In California, this deadly crime led to 802 deaths because someone failed to designate a sober driver. Nationally, the latest data shows nearly 10,000 were killed by an impaired driving. “Over the course of the past three years, we have investigated 127 DUI collisions with 28 injuries, which included one fatal collision,” Milpitas police Sgt. Raj Maharaj said. Officers will be looking for signs of alcohol and/or drug impairment with officers checking drivers for proper licensing delaying motorists only momentarily. When possible, specially trained officers will be available to evaluate those suspected of drug-impaired driving. Recent statistics reveal that 30 percent of drivers in fatal crashes had one or more drugs in their systems. A study of active drivers showed more tested positive for drugs that may impair driving (14 percent) than did for alcohol

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CDOT Launches New Campaign to Target Marijuana Impaired Driving

CDOT Launches New Campaign to Target Marijuana Impaired Driving Drive High, Get a DUI STATEWIDE—Colorado made history this year by becoming the first state to sell marijuana to anyone over the age of 21. At a press conference this afternoon, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) made history again by announcing the launch of an education campaign targeted at drivers about the dangers of driving under the influence of marijuana. In 2012, there were 630 drivers involved in 472 motor vehicle fatalities on Colorado roadways. Of the 630 drivers involved, 286 were tested for drugs. Nearly 27 percent of drivers tested had a positive drug test, with 12 percent testing positive for cannabis. The official kick-off of CDOT’s new Drive High, Get a DUI campaign includes a series of television commercials that will air during shows targeting males between the ages 21-34, who tend to have the highest number of DUIs. There will also be widespread outreach to rental car companies and dispensaries to inform tourists and marijuana users about marijuana driving laws in Colorado. “Before beginning the campaign, we did extensive research about medical and recreational marijuana users’ perceptions of marijuana’s effects on driving,” said Amy Ford, CDOT Communications Director. “We heard repeatedly that people thought marijuana didn’t impact their driving ability, and some believed it actually made them a better

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