Beat DMV & Keep Driving

California’s DMV suspends about 350,000 driver licenses a year–more than New York, Texas, Illinois and Florida combined! And that doesn’t include the license applications DMV denies or the renewals DMV refuses. Even though DMV is usually required to give you a hearing before any adverse action becomes permanent, these hearings are so unfair that only about 7% of motorists ever beat DMV. We can help.

Law Office of Rodney Gould

When Not Driving Is Not An Option

Our BEAT DMV guides give you proven techniques that can beat DMV at its own game. Our team includes DMV attorneys, forensic toxicologists, insurance experts and retired law enforcement officers, so whether you’re trying to get a license, renew it, or keep it, we can provide you a comprehensive strategy to solve your entire DMV problem.

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Writs & Appeals to Beat DMV

Writs and appeals are the two methods for overturning adverse decisions by state agencies and superior courts. Both are considered “appellate” remedies, but they operate differently, depending on the nature of the adverse decision itself.

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Stay the Suspension

The first step is to get you driving again, usually within a few days after hiring us. It is only fair that you get to drive during the time it takes us to show the judge DMV was wrong!

Win the Writ

Once you’re driving again, we’ll put our full appellate resources behind overturning the suspension permanently. The writ reinstates your driver license and clears your driving record.

DMV Pays Your Costs

If DMV was “arbitrary and capricious,” the state must pay your attorneys’ fees. The threat of having to pay attorneys’ fees often prompts DMV to settle cases before the court date.

Special Certificate Writ in San Francisco

Rodney Gould was awesome!  DMV took away my special certificate as a School Pupil Activities Bus (SPAB) driver without any reason. Mr. Gould proved them wrong and got my certificate back. Thank you Mr. Gould!

Michael M., San Francisco

Very Appreciative

Rodney Gould got us a writ of mandate in San Bernardino when DMV unfairly suspended my son for zero tolerance. In court the judge took our side on every issue! Rodney is a wonderful wonderful man and has been there for our family through one of the most difficult times in my life. My husband and I are very appreciative.

Becky J., San Bernardino

O.C. Attorney Refers All Writs

DMV isn’t fair nor do they follow the law 100% of the time. Sometimes, you need a writ attorney to step in and fight the DMV on appeal. Rodney Gould is the only attorney I will refer possible writ cases to. Every one of my clients Mr. Gould retained for writ has resulted in a reversal of the DMV decision as well as a stay of suspension. I endorse Mr. Gould and look forward to working with him in the future.

Julia Simmons, Esq., Newport Beach

Attorney

When Not Driving Is Not An Option – BEAT DMV

California’s DMV suspends about 350,000 driver licenses a year—more than New York, Texas, Illinois and Florida combined! And that does not include the license applications DMV denies or the renewals DMV refuses.

Even though DMV is usually required to give you a hearing before any adverse action becomes permanent, these hearings are so unfair that only about 7% of motorists ever beat DMV. The rules are complex and grossly favor DMV, and when you get to the hearing, you find that the DMV prosecutor is the same person who decides your case.

Our BEAT DMV guides give you proven techniques that can beat DMV at its own game. Our team includes DMV attorneys, forensic toxicologists, insurance experts and retired law enforcement officers, so whether you’re trying to get a license, renew it, or keep it, we can provide you a comprehensive strategy to solve your entire DMV problem.

Even if your license has already been suspended, there is still hope. In most cases, you can ask a superior court judge to issue an order called a writ of mandate to force DMV to give you your license back. You’ll need a lawyer to get a writ, but we can help you there, too.

In many cases, we can even make DMV pay our fees. If you’re suspended now, contact us immediately to get your license back. There are many ways to use this site. Take some time to educate yourself about all things DMV, the issues and the solutions. We suggest you start with How To Use BEAT DMV.

Timely Responses

We pride ourselves on our responsiveness. If we are not able to speak to you immediately, you can expect a return call within hours, not days.
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Innovative Ideas

We’ve learned that even when cases seem hopeless, there is more than one way to beat DMV. Our thinking outside the box keeps people driving.
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Advanced Technology

Our client portal gives you real time access to your case information online and provides a direct, secure communication channel with our attorneys.
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Clear Communication

Our ability to communicate effectively with our clients and their attorneys in preparing their cases maximizes the chance of success.

Call Us Today & Beat DMV

Rodney Gould, Esq. can help anyone anywhere in California with DMV issues.
You have nothing to lose and your license to gain!

(818) 981-1760

Beat DMV Blog

DMV & DUI News, Anecdotes, Strategies, Surprises

LAPD admits to tampering with in-car video cameras

The L.A. Times reported yesterday that the LAPD has known for months that officers had been disabling the antennas which provide audio for the in-car video cameras. The antennas pick up the feed from the microphones on the officers’ belts so that audio is recorded with the video up to several hundred yards from the vehicle, said Sgt. Dan Gomez, a department expert on the recording devices. The abuse seemed to have been concentrated in South Central Los Angeles, where approximately 80 cars had missing antennas in the South L.A. Patrol Division alone. Police Chief Charlie Beck (pictured), said he chose not to investigate which officers had removed the cameras, but merely to tell them not to do it again....

DUIs For Even a Trace of Weed Being Considered in California

click to enlarge                                               Timothy Norris for LA Weekly A proposal in the state legislature could mean DUIs for drivers who aren’t stoned but who toked a few days ago. It would also target motorists who have even a trace of such prescription drugs as Ambien, Vicodin or even phentermine, a diet drug, in their systems when they’re stopped by cops who think they’re impaired. Medical marijuana supporters are aghast. And they might have good reason to be: Weed’s main ingredient, THC, can stay in your bloodstream for a few days, even if you’re long past being stoned. The cannabis community says laws like this (which was also proposed last year, unsuccessfully) will have the effect of persecuting regular medicinal users. The bill, AB 2500, was recently introduced by Assemblyman Jim Frazier. It would mean that any detected amount of any controlled substance, including some prescription medicines, would be cause for a drunk-driving conviction. We reached out to Frazier’s people for his take on this, but we had yet to hear back. According to the language of the legislation:   This bill would make it unlawful for a person to drive a motor vehicle if his or her blood contains any detectable amount of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol of marijuana or any other drug classified in Schedules I, II, III, or IV of the California Uniform Controlled Substance Act. Dale Gieringer, director of California NORML, told us the bill “gives you a DUI if you have any controlled substance in your blood stream. It’s pretty extreme.” As it works its way through the legislature, it’s possible AB 2500 could be amended to apply only to marijuana,...

CDOT Launches New Campaign to Target Marijuana Impaired Driving

CDOT Launches New Campaign to Target Marijuana Impaired Driving Drive High, Get a DUI STATEWIDE—Colorado made history this year by becoming the first state to sell marijuana to anyone over the age of 21. At a press conference this afternoon, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) made history again by announcing the launch of an education campaign targeted at drivers about the dangers of driving under the influence of marijuana. In 2012, there were 630 drivers involved in 472 motor vehicle fatalities on Colorado roadways. Of the 630 drivers involved, 286 were tested for drugs. Nearly 27 percent of drivers tested had a positive drug test, with 12 percent testing positive for cannabis. The official kick-off of CDOT’s new Drive High, Get a DUI campaign includes a series of television commercials that will air during shows targeting males between the ages 21-34, who tend to have the highest number of DUIs. There will also be widespread outreach to rental car companies and dispensaries to inform tourists and marijuana users about marijuana driving laws in Colorado. “Before beginning the campaign, we did extensive research about medical and recreational marijuana users’ perceptions of marijuana’s effects on driving,” said Amy Ford, CDOT Communications Director. “We heard repeatedly that people thought marijuana didn’t impact their driving ability, and some believed it actually made them a better driver. The Drive High, Get a DUI campaign takes a neutral stance on legalization, and will focus awareness efforts on impaired driving laws in Colorado.” In September 2013, CDOT conducted a phone survey of 770 Coloradans on their attitudes and behaviors related to marijuana and driving. About two-thirds of marijuana users...

‘Drive High, Get a DUI’ campaign launches in Colorado to stop stoned driving

DENVER - Colorado is launching a new “Drive High, Get A DUI” campaign to remind drivers that newly legal weed should be treated like alcohol and not consumed before driving. The campaign includes radio and TV ads and new posters to be displayed in dispensaries. The other part of the effort is enforcement. Right now, 200 officers of various agencies are trained recognition experts. Another 20 graduated with that certification Thursday. Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper calls this a top priority, and wants at least 300 officers to be trained with this certification by next year. During 56 hours of training, officers are taught a 12-step process for recognizing the symptoms of drivers who may be impaired by a variety of drugs or alcohol. With marijuana, the officers are taught to look for enlarged pupils, sniff for the drug’s odor and look for small tremors in the driver’s body. “We teach them to look at certain things, and it is kind of an elimination process,” said Sgt. Rodney Noga from the Colorado State Patrol. Officers also check blood pressure, muscle softness and look for injection sites for other kinds of drug use. If drivers fail the observation test, a blood test is the next option to confirm or deny the presence of drug or alcohol impairment. The effort from the Colorado Department of Transportation comes as Colorado struggles to keep accurate statewide records on marijuana-impaired drivers. State police chiefs told lawmakers this week that they need more money to train officers in recognizing stoned drivers. The chiefs wrote a letter saying, in part, that they “have diverted staff from other...